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Employment Specialist – PAVE Job Training Program, New Avenues for Youth

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New Avenues Commitment to Equity: 

New Avenues for Youth imagines a community where all young people thrive and experience health, well-being, and a self-determined home. Historical inequities and intersecting forms of oppression such as racism, poverty, adultism, sexism, homophobia, and ableism, among others contribute to marginalization and exploitation of youth. We believe, to redress youth homelessness and housing instability we must challenge and dismantle racism and other forms of oppression and build relationships within our communities that advance equity.

At New Avenues, advancing equity is an ongoing commitment without closure. We remain open-minded and presume best intentions, knowing that discomfort and conflict are inevitable. We take risks and make and learn from our mistakes. We seek multiple perspectives, strive for transparency, remain humble, and resist the urge to silence hard truths.               

About New Avenues for Youth:  

New Avenues for Youth imagines a community where all young people thrive and experience health, well-being, and a self-determined home.  New Avenues works in partnership with the Portland community to provide homeless, foster-care, and at-risk youth of all backgrounds with the resources and skills needed to lead healthy, productive lives.  We are a diverse non-profit organization in our 20th year serving youth.

The Position:

The Employment Specialist will work with New Avenues PAVE job training program to support homeless and at-risk youth develop and follow through on employment, education, and personal goals. The Employment Specialist integrates the results of academic, life skills, and work readiness assessments to develop an individualized goal plan with youth. This position will also provide one-on-one services and support in order to help youth obtain and retain employment and complete education goals.  As a part of the PAVE team, the Employment Specialist will help maintain a structured, supportive and safe milieu. In addition, the Employment Specialist will collaborate with staff across New Avenues in order to create a model that provides the most effective, comprehensive services for program youth.

Education & Experience:

  • Bachelor’s degree in related field preferred
  • At least 2 years’ experience working with at-risk youth
  • Workforce development experience preferred
  • Strong interpersonal and communication skills
  • Strong organizational and detail-orientation skills
  • Strong computer skills required
  • Willingness and ability to drive company vehicle in order to transport clients to various community activities is required
  • Ability to work with multicultural staff and youth
  • Bilingual English/Spanish preferred


Skills & knowledge:

  • Provide educational and vocational assessments to determine youth’s current skills and areas of growth.
  • Develop an individualized youth service plan with youth’s input that is guided by the assessment results, for each youth enrolled in PAVE.
  • Utilize traditional and non-traditional methods of education to engage youth in the program and identify school and work related goals and plans.
  • Provide support and guidance to help youth expand work readiness skills, post-secondary readiness, and accomplish identified goals.
  • Provide job support when needed to assist a youth in retaining employment
  • Maintain regular bi-weekly to monthly contact with youth enrolled in PAVE.
  • Facilitate individual and group opportunities for youth to further develop employment and post-secondary skills.
  • Provide referral to other programs and services as needed.
  • Maintain accurate and timely documentation of all services. Track youth participation in activities and document youth progress in these activities in accordance with performance reporting requirements using an electronic data collection system.

New Avenues for Youth offers a very generous benefits package.  To apply, send your cover letter and resume to jobs@newavenues.org.  Please be sure to include where you came across this opportunity in your response. You can learn more about New Avenues by visiting our website athttp://www.newavenues.org/contact-us/employment-opportunities.  New Avenues for Youth is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Communications Specialist, Girls Scouts of Oregon and sw Washington – Portland

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Girl Scouts of Oregon and sw Washington’s Commitment to Equity:

Girl Scouts has valued and supported all girls since our inception in 1912. The foundation of diversity that Juliette Gordon Low established runs throughout Girl Scouting to this day. Our mission extends to all girls, and through our program they develop the necessary leadership skills to advance diversity and promote inclusion. We wish for all girls to see themselves reflected in the organization they are a part of, and seek to model the values of diversity and inclusion we hope to instill in them. In order to achieve these goals, we are committed to creating and fostering racial and ethnic diversity at every level of the organization.

Position Summary:

The Communications Specialist is an integral part of a fast-paced, project and results-oriented communications team. She or he is primarily responsible for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington’s digital brand, and works collaboratively with the Director of Communications to develop and manage other forms of communication for the council.

Please click HERE for a full job description and how to apply instructions.

Equity & Inclusion Coordinator, Oregon Food Bank

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Oregon Food Bank’s Commitment to Equity:

At Oregon Food Bank (OFB), we hold people experiencing hunger and food insecurity in Oregon and SW Washington at the center of our actions and decisions. We envision a community where each person can participate, prosper and have access to food that is both nourishing and in keeping with their culture. We recognize that systemic injustices exist – such as racism, classism, and sexism – and that these create and perpetuate conditions that sustain poverty and hunger.

Understanding this, we commit to serve marginalized communities, in both urban and rural environments, in ways that value who they are and their lived experiences. We resolve to listen to and include these communities in our work, and to respond where bias and inequities appear. We will confront oppression and poverty by developing solutions to hunger that are community-driven, honor a diversity of needs, and value everyone. Our food programs and public policy efforts aim to build a society where everyone can thrive – celebrating our differences and working together to overcome injustices that might divide us…because no one should be hungry.

Oregon Food Bank is an Equal Opportunity Employer, and we encourage applications from candidates who can contribute to the diversity of our organization.

Position Summary

Who we are looking for:

As part of the People & Culture (Human Resources) department, the Equity & Inclusion Coordinator will help put Oregon Food Bank’s equity plans into action. This position will help level-up our internal capacity to provide culturally-relevant services to clients we serve.  This will be accomplished in part by advising internal teams and/or providing trainings; supporting and project-managing our Equity Plan tasks; assisting in the development of communications about our equity and inclusion work; helping us consistently apply an equity lens to our decisions; and strengthening relationships with communities of color or other social service organizations.  This full-time role reports to the Director of People & Culture and could be based in either our NE Portland or Beaverton office.

Who you are:

You care deeply about people experiencing hunger and are passionate about empowering them by helping to shape OFB’s equitable and inclusive practices that address the root causes of hunger. You are a courageous advocate who can both collaborate with others and also speak your truth. You have skill both in building relationships and “getting stuff done.”  Staff at all levels feel comfortable seeking you out for advice knowing you start from a place of strength and partnership to assist them in problem-solving or mapping activities or changing processes to support our equity initiatives. An effective project manager, you are known for your ability to prioritize multiple tasks to meet deadlines, and to move others into action. Inclusivity and equity is both a passion and a lived experience.

Click HERE for the full job description.

Program Director, SMART Portland

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SMARsmart-logo-vertical-blackT’S COMMITMENT TO EQUITY

As an early literacy program focused on helping children succeed with reading and learning, SMART can’t ignore that deep racial, cultural, social, and economic inequities in our country and state make it harder for some children to succeed compared to others. SMART’s vision is an Oregon in which every child can read and is empowered to succeed, and we are making equity a top priority.  As part of this, we particularly seek staff members, volunteers, and board members whose personal or professional background gives them unique perspective to further SMART’s work in serving children of color and children from other marginalized groups.

POSITION SUMMARY

Want to be the heartbeat of our organization?  Consider a leading role on the front lines of the state’s largest volunteer-based literacy nonprofit organization, SMART (Start Making A Reader Today) reading program.  SMART partners with schools around the state and engages community volunteers to read one-on-one with 10,500 PreK through third-grade children annually, helping strengthen literacy skills and encourage a love of reading. Participating children also receive new books each month to keep and read with their families.

Behind the scenes, our Program Director leads program initiatives and implements the strategic plan. A top goal is advancing our overarching commitment to equity: on our team, in our selection of books, with our volunteers, the children we serve, and in the schools.

With 10,500 children, 5,000 volunteers, and nearly 40 employees in 9 regions, you need to know how to provide commanding leadership, make the team believers in our values, and orchestrate memorable celebrations of our success.

This position is one of five on the organization’s core leadership team. You are at the table as the subject expert on early childhood literacy with the Executive Director and Directors of Finance, Communications, and Development. To view the complete job description, click here.

To catch our attention please tell us what you know about:

  • Educational equity. First-hand experience in underrepresented communities is a plus.
  • Supporting literacy development for English Language Learners.
  • Management of geographically disbursed sites.
  • Motivation of volunteers and staff.

You will also want to confirm your formal training and university education in literacy.

Please upload your resume and cover letter using the following link: https://smart.hiringthing.com/job/39392/program-director   

First review of applicants will be March 14. The position will be considered opened until filled.

Salary range and benefit information will be disclosed if selected for phone interview.

Happy New Year!

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Hello Everyone and Happy New Year!

As we reflect back on our first year as an organization there is a lot to be thankful for. Over the last year we were able to build a stellar team who have brought with them a high level of expertise and passion as well as a diverse set of perspectives and skill sets. We couldn’t be more excited about the community we are developing at CEI. As we move into the new year we will continue to focus on building a strong foundation
that is in integrity with the tenants of equity, diversity, and inclusion.

In 2016 we partnered with over 30 local and national organizations; these organizations ranged from non-profits to for profit, education to philanthropy. Whether it was an organization of 14 staff members or as large as 25,000; we had the great pleasure to partner with individuals and organizations who made a conscious decision to invest in their employees, and communities they serve, by committing to a transformative process to advance equity, diversity and inclusion within their workplaces. The courage and will that it takes to invest the time, energy, and resources in such a comprehensive approach to this work has been nothing short of inspiring to be a part of. Additionally, in the last quarter of 2016 we had over 90 individuals sign up for workshops and events at CEI in order to build the skills and community needed to create inclusive communities in their personal and professional lives. Over this past year we have been heartened by the commitment to equity that we are experiencing.

We also want to acknowledge what a difficult year 2016 was in the context of race and social justice in this country. Amidst the ongoing injustices and disparities felt by marginalized communities in our country, CEI has become more steadfast and determined in what we have to offer.  Now, more than ever we are inspired to guide others in organizational and personal transformation, so our generation and the generations that follow live in a more inclusive world.  We must come together. We must act together in the name of a more just social/ political experience.

Here we come, 2017!

In solidarity,

Hanif Fazal, CEO

Vice President of Programs, Boys and Girls Club Portland

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bgcBGCP is committed to ensuring an inclusive, diverse and equitable work environment. We aspire to filter all policies and practices through a trauma-informed care and equity-based lens. We position ourselves as lifelong learners, and seek individuals who have a desire to serve youth, enhance communities, and are hungry for ongoing personal growth and professional development.

General Position Summary:

The VP of Programs (VPP) reports to the CEO and serves a critical role on BGCP’s executive management team, representing the work and the voices of the organization’s diverse and talented youth development professionals. The VPP contributes to the successful execution of the strategic vision and leadership of the overall organization; oversees a senior program management team; is responsible for fiscal, staffing and professional development; and the delivery of quality service, and impact goals set forth for BGCP’s program areas. BGCP programs are designed for, and guided by, these key focus areas: Development of Character and Leadership skills; Education and Career advancement; Health and Life Skills; The Arts; and Sports, Fitness and Recreation.

To learn more about this position, view the description below or click here.

vp-of-programs

New Avenues for Youth

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New Avenues for Youth’s Commitment to Equity:new-avenues
Director of Finance and Quality Assurance.

New Avenues for Youth imagines a community where all young people thrive and experience health, well-being, and a self-determined home. Historical inequities and intersecting forms of oppression such as racism, poverty, adultism, sexism, homophobia, and ableism, among others contribute to marginalization and exploitation of youth. We believe, to redress youth homelessness and housing instability we must challenge and dismantle racism and other forms of oppression and build relationships within our communities that advance equity.

At New Avenues, advancing equity is an ongoing commitment without closure. We remain open-minded and presume best intentions, knowing that discomfort and conflict are inevitable. We take risks and make and learn from our mistakes. We seek multiple perspectives, strive for transparency, remain humble, and resist the urge to silence hard truths.

The Position:

The Director of Finance and Compliance is a member of the senior leadership team primarily charged with overseeing the Finance and Quality Assurance departments. The Director of Finance and Compliance is responsible for all aspects of financial management including audit support, monthly financial analytics, cash flow, budget development and monitoring. This director serves as a strategic partner to program managers; regularly reviewing financial results, program performance, and contract compliance.

Learn more about this position in the attached document or click here.

director-of-finance-and-qa-2016

Director of Finance & Administration, SMART

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SMARsmart-logo-vertical-blackT’S COMMITMENT TO EQUITY

As an early literacy program focused on helping children succeed with reading and learning, SMART can’t ignore that deep racial, cultural, social, and economic inequities in our country and state make it harder for some children to succeed compared to others. SMART’s vision is an Oregon in which every child can read and is empowered to succeed, and we are making equity a top priority.  As part of this, we particularly seek staff members, volunteers, and board members whose personal or professional background gives them unique perspective to further SMART’s work in serving children of color and children from other marginalized groups.

POSITION SUMMARY

The Director of Finance and Administration will be a strategic thought-partner and a member of the organization’s Executive Team. The Director will lead and manage the following areas: finance, budgeting, human resources, administration and IT. The Director also manages or assists with special projects on an as-needed basis, and liaises with other departments and area offices. This is a hands-on position, requiring an ability to handle day-to-day accounting duties, as well as the financial planning activities for the organization. As the administrator for Human Resources, the Director plays a critical role in recruitment, retention, and professional development of staff, including establishing policies and practices that support a vibrant work culture and engaged staff team.

Learn more about this position in the attached document or click here.

director-of-finance-2016

What It Will Take, a Blog Post by CEO Hanif Fazal

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hanif

What It Will Take

-Hanif Fazal, CEO

I was recently facilitating a Racial Equity Institute for educators. During one of our sessions a history teacher reflected, “We continue to subscribe to the false narrative that this country was built by the people and for the people…”. Later that night as I reflected on that statement I was reminded of a conversation with another educator and friend who is deeply engaged in racial equity work at her school and within her school district. She was recounting a trip she made to a World War II museum down in the south. As she was describing the exhibits in the museum, I noticed something was missing from her description, so I decided to ask. “How did they depict the Japanese Internment, or did they do anything to acknowledge that aspect of the war?” Her response was one that was unfortunately to be expected: “They left that out.”

In so many ways the reflections from both educators describe a question that has been driving my work and our work at the Center for Equity and Inclusion (CEI). How do we find our collective empowerment in a system designed for our oppression? Translated: The history teacher was right. The foundation of this country was never built by all people nor designed to serve all people. No hyperbole here, just being factual. This is the 1878 Carlisle school mission to “Kill the Indian, Save the Child”, this is slavery, this is mass lynching, this is the Chinese Exclusion Act, this is the Dred Scott Decision, this is our supreme court constructing whiteness, by literally ruling on who is white and who is not white (Takoa Ozawa v. United States and Bhagat Singh Thind), this is science constructing a racial hierarchy that placed Caucasians on the top, this is the Trail of Tears and the attempted genocide of Native Americans, this is the theft of land from Mexico, this is Jim Crow, this is something that was woven mercilessly into the fabric of our country. A factual examination of history as the history teacher was inferring, makes it easy to see that our country never included non-white communities in it’s initial design, in fact many “Americans” went to great social and legal lengths to ensure non-white people couldn’t participate in, or help build and maintain our country’s, laws, institutions, institution’s policies, culture, or cultural norms. As the all too familiar sign stated: “Whites Only.”

We as a country continually suggest and want to believe that just because our country’s foundation is built on racism and white supremacy, that doesn’t necessarily have any impact in today’s world. These suggestions continue to be asserted in the face of data that says otherwise-increasing wealth gap disparities (Whites hold 12 times the wealth of African Americans, 10 times that of Latinos), education achievement gaps at almost every measure and mass incarceration disparities that have devastated the African American community and communities of color. The red lining of yesterday has left us segregated geographically and created a net worth gap that seems difficult to recover from; whites right now are living in neighborhoods that are roughly 80% white, the homeownership rate for whites is 71% while for blacks it is 41.9%, Latino’s 45.2% and Native Americans 51%. Name the social success indicator and you will most likely find a racial disparity connected to it. Socially we continue to be divided as well; divided by how we feel about our country and divided by how we feel about the institutions that serve and sustain our country. The non-stop issues with Policing are a prime example of this.

My friend and colleague’s experience at the museum is quintessential of the way in which this foundation maintains a hold today. Think about this for a second. How do you have a World War II museum and not depict the Japanese Internment? Who made the decision to depict the war and time period in this manner? Do you think the Japanese community was included in the initial design of the museum?  What or who informed and supported that decision? Dive deeper, what must the experience be of Japanese Americans, or even the broader Asian community as they walk through that museum? As one teacher of Asian decent stated in a recent training of mine, “our experience is found in a small box, on a single page, in the corner of a history book-if at all”.  What is the collective and on-going impact of completely marginalizing an entire culture’s experience of this country? As people of color in general, who experience this type of marginalization daily, what are we consuming and how is it impacting how we see and experience ourselves, our worth, our place in this society?

Dive even deeper, what must the experience be for white people as they live in a culture that demands of its individuals and institutions that we depict our history and our current state, through a lens of “American Exceptionalism” when this is far from the truth. What is the collective impact of having your story told in a manner that rewrites the attempted genocide of Native Americans as “Manifest Destiny”, the massive theft of land from Mexico as a “treaty”, that allows for a walk through a World War II museum that ends with a feeling of pride, victory, and patriotism, to have your suburban home and lifestyle be attributed solely to hard work and personal responsibility? To have mass incarceration happening around you but rarely experience what is happening or notice how you are contributing to it.  We could go on, and on… How have white people benefitted-actually profited from this current and historical arrangement? How are they participating both consciously and unconsciously in this arrangement every day. AND just as importantly, how has it cost them?

Let me be clear. This is NOT an attempt to ascribe the USA as a horrible country or white US Americans as bad human beings, nor is it an attempt to ascribe non-white folks as complete victims. Rather it is an attempt at questioning our history as it has been taught to us, our present as it has been repackaged and our unconscious participation in it all. It comes from an understanding that until we address the foundation that this country is built on, our past will always be our present.

This of course leads to the inevitable questions:  what can anyone really do about this? Where do you even start? We at CEI, along with racial equity leaders across our country and a growing number of people across racial backgrounds, professions, and cultural backgrounds-every day people- are beginning to answer those questions together.

In August, we launched a year long process with 50 educators, who came together to build a common understanding of the foundation of our country which opened the door to the ultimate question we need to be sitting in: “If not this, then what?” This question is positioning teachers and school building leaders to learn how to build in their students — through their classroom environments, curriculum and instruction — a strong sense of cultural identity and an ability to navigate cultures different than their own. It is pushing counselors and support staff to develop accountable but less exclusionary forms of discipline, it is having educators re-think how to engage non-white and white families, and challenging teachers to create not just more culturally relevant but more culturally inclusive curriculum and instruction.

We are working with for- profit, non-profit and philanthropic organizations in moving through a transformative process that challenges them to apply an equity lens onto every aspect of their organizations. This has lead to more inclusive hiring practices, new ways of fundraising, more culturally responsive services, diversified leadership, more equitable grant making processes, and new strategies to market services.  It is having them learn language and protocols that assist them in talking about and locating in a productive manner how institutional, cultural, and individual racism is showing up in their organizations. Most importantly it is having them work together to not just dismantle the racism they are now able to locate, but begin building new more inclusive and equitable organizations.

In November we will open our doors to the general public and support every day individuals in unpacking issues of racial equity and integrating this work with their friends, families, and communities. There is so much we can do.

This country may not have been built by the people, for the people, but what if in the next chapter of this country we were able to rebuild a country that IS?

We at the Center for Equity and Inclusion are focused on participating in the rebuilding effort. We believe this is our generation’s path to Civil Rights: Supporting a significant shift in our collective consciousness that creates the will, passion, and commitment to developing more just and inclusive institutional policies, cultural narratives, and individual behaviors. We believe that a macro level change will be the result of thousands and thousands of micro changes. In other words, social change will happen in workplaces, families, communities and one on one relationships — in small cells that are constantly expanding. This ultimately means that you, the reader, really matter; that all of us have influence and we must learn how to exercise this influence on behalf of something bigger. It means that moment to moment we get to choose to contribute to a more inclusive state or continue perpetuating the status quo. Our collective choices add up.

This long, hard, grind, that requires on-going challenging conversations and shifting consciousness person by person, organization by organization; is our generations “Long Walk to Freedom”, our Peace and Reconciliation process. It is the legacy we leave behind for our children, and the honoring of our fore mothers and fathers. It is our turn to take the necessary steps that lead to a country that is truly free.

 

Sources:
CNN Money: Middle class whites live in nicer neighborhoods than blacks Tami Luhby, June 26
Black applicants more than twice as likely as whites to be denied home loans, Zillow, Inc. Feb. 9th, 2015
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/black-applicants-more-than-twice-as-likely-to-be-denied-home-loans-300032609.html